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Emergency Response: Everything You Need To Know About Chemical & Oil Spills

Everything You Need To Know About Spills

Emergency - no time to read this?  To report oil and hazardous chemical spills, call the National Response Center 1-800-424-8802

  • How the Regulations and Response System Work
  • Oil Spill Information
     
  • Chemical Spills
     
  • SPCC Plans (Spill Prevention, Control & Countermeasures)
     
  • NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (NPG)
    The NPG is a source of general industrial hygiene information on several hundred chemicals/classes for workers, employers, and occupational health professionals. It presents key information and data in abbreviated or tabular form for chemicals or substance groupings (e.g. cyanides, fluorides, manganese compounds) that are found in the work environment.
    You can download a free stand-alone HTML version of the NPG compressed as a ZIP file. The ZIP file contains a condensed version of the NPG. All non-Pocket Guide links were removed so that this set of files acts as a "stand-alone" database. These files can be used with a standard web browser or on some mobile devices.
  • NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM)
    DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 94-113 (1994)
    NMAM is a collection of methods for sampling and analysis of contaminants in workplace air, and in the blood and urine of workers who are occupationally exposed.
  • International Chemical Safety Cards (WHO/IPCS/ILO)
    IPCS cards summarize essential health and safety information on chemicals for their use at the "shop floor" level by workers and employers in factories, agriculture, construction and other work places.
  • Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH)
    IDLHs document the criteria and information sources that have been used to determine immediately dangerous to life or health concentrations of workers.
  • NIOSH Chemical Agent Information for Emergency Responders
    Includes NIOSH Emergency Response Cards, information on Cyanide, Sarin, Nitrogen Mustard, Sulfur Mustard, VX, other chemicals.
  • Other NIOSH Databases
    Additional data resources on Chemical Hazards, Agriculture, Construction, Respirators, more...

    Overview

    There are four primary Federal statutes that require release reporting including CERCLA , the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 ( EPCRA ), the Hazardous Material Transportation Act of 1974 ( HMTA ), and the CWA (the Clean Water Act).

    In addition, because CERCLA defines hazardous substances to include CWA hazardous substances and toxic pollutants, the Clean Air Act ( CAA ) hazardous air pollutants, the RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) hazardous wastes, and the Toxic Substances Control Act ( TSCA ) imminently hazardous chemical substances, releases of these substances are also subject to CERCLA reporting requirements.

    Part or all of the information from these reports may be collected in ERNS. The four primary statutes and their resulting regulations, citations, and relationship to ERNS are shown below.

    Statute (Cite for Reporting Requirements)

    Who Responds?

    It depends upon the type and place of the spill.  Examples of Responding Agencies: